Category Archives: Cop’s Corner

Officer Ray Chapuis has over 25 years of experience as a sworn law enforcer for local, county, and state agencies, and he has served the last 10 years as a North Carolina probation/parole officer. He writes articles about law enforcement issues that are of interest not only to criminal justice professionals but also everyday citizens.

Political correctness

Ray Chapuis
Ray Chapuis

I am not into politics but I have to say I like the “in your face’’ style of presidential candidate Donald Trump. Many things he says are true but at the same time not “politically correct” and that is refreshing.

Although it is refreshing to hear plain talk from a political candidate, it still is not “politically correct” and in the modern age of politics this may be more hurtful to his campaign. At the same time I think the American people want to hear the truth and, although his delivery is not smooth, the fact is as of this writing, he is leading in the polls out of all the Republican presidential candidates. This is very interesting to me.

Continue reading Political correctness

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Let ’em Live and Let ’em Work

Ray Chapuis
Ray Chapuis

The title is quite catchy, but I must admit, I did not come up with it. This has been a slogan used by different states’ transportation departments in conjunction with the Federal Highway Administration’s campaign to reduce highway fatalities, specifically targeting highway workers. Continue reading Let ’em Live and Let ’em Work

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“All lives matter” should be protestors’ slogan

Ray Chapuis
Ray Chapuis

As an officer sworn to uphold the law and a Randolph County citizen, I must say probably the most disturbing “theme” in reaction to recent police use of force incidents in cities across the United States has been the images of protesters both peaceful and violent holding signs that read “black lives matter.” Continue reading “All lives matter” should be protestors’ slogan

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DEADLY FORCE, part 3: Cops don’t want the 12 or the 6

Ray Chapuis
Ray Chapuis

Scenario 1: A man walks into a convenience store and tells the clerk he has a gun and “to give him all the money.” The clerk does not see the gun but he has an object obviously hidden under his jacket. The clerk gives him the money and the man flees, only to be met by police in the parking lot. Never responding to commands from police and never showing his hands or the object, he is shot and killed. The “gun” turns out to be a banana. Continue reading DEADLY FORCE, part 3: Cops don’t want the 12 or the 6

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Deadly Force, part 2: Follow your training

Ray Chapuis
Ray Chapuis

I have been working as a 911 Emergency Medical Dispatcher since 2000 for Randolph County Emergency Services. All of that time has been as part-time employment except for a 7-month period when I was a full-time employee.

This is enjoyable work that serves to compliment my job as a full time Probation Officer as well as working to serve the citizens of Randolph County to be part of a great team that strives to bring professional and timely 911 service to all citizens. Continue reading Deadly Force, part 2: Follow your training

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Deadly force, part 1: Life-altering events

Ray Chapuis
Ray Chapuis

In the light of the recent officer-involved shooting of Walter L. Scott by former N. Charleston Police Officer Michael Slager, I felt this would be an appropriate time to touch on the issue of law enforcement’s use of deadly force.

As I have seen various news outlets play and replay video and cell phone footage, I can honestly say that I cringe when I see it. As a probation officer, as with any sworn law enforcement officer, I am guided on the use of deadly force by department policy, and both state and federal law. I have yearly firearms qualification and classroom instruction in the law/statutes governing deadly force. Continue reading Deadly force, part 1: Life-altering events

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Is perception the problem?

Ray Chapuis
Ray Chapuis

This article will touch on the public perception of corrections and law enforcement.

These professions have always been a tough business. Over the course of a career, officers see the best and the worst in humanity. They may be thanked for what they do, then be spit upon not an hour later.

Continue reading Is perception the problem?

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