Category Archives: Eric Abernethy’s Shot of the Issue

Eric is a free lance photographer currently residing in Asheboro. He spends most of his free time photographing nature throughout North Carolina. These are only a handful from a collection of thousands of his amazing photographs.

Common sight

A group of Canadian geese fly across Lake Lucas at sunset. Canadian geese are common throughout North Carolina, inhabiting waters of all sizes throughout the year.

ERIC ABERNETHY is a free lance photographer currently residing in Asheboro. He spends most of his free time photographing nature
throughout North Carolina. His fine art nature photography is available at fineartamerica.com (search Eric Abernethy). He also is available for various photographic services, including wedding, event and environmental portrait photography, including both pets and people. Contact him at ericabernethyphotography.com
or follow his work on Facebook.

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Enjoy its beauty: Just 7 days to do so

A luna moth rests inches above Lake Lucas waters. The size, up to 4.5 inches, and distinct lime green color make the luna moth a standout when encountered. They are usually seen at night when the majority of flight time takes place. The adult luna does not eat, it doesn’t even have a mouth. It only has about 7 days to live, during which time its goal is to mate and reproduce.

ERIC ABERNETHY is a free lance photographer currently
residing in Asheboro. He spends most of his free time
photographing nature throughout North Carolina. His fine
art nature photography is available at fineartamerica.com (search Eric Abernethy). He also is available for various photographic services, including wedding, event and environmental portrait photography, including both pets and people. Contact him at ericabernethyphotography.com or follow his work on Facebook.

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Lightning power

Lightning strikes over downtown Asheboro during a thunderstorm. Lightning photographs can be captured by using a tripod for camera steadiness and long exposures between 5 and 30 seconds.

ERIC ABERNETHY is a free lance photographer currently residing
in Asheboro. He spends most of his free time photographing nature
throughout North Carolina. His fine art nature photography is available at fineartamerica.com (search Eric Abernethy). He also is available for various photographic services, including wedding, event and environmental portrait photography, including both pets and people. Contact him at ericabernethyphotography.com
or follow his work on Facebook.

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ON THE PROWL

A scarlet kingsnake winds through pine bark and pine needles recently. Scarlet Kingsnakes show up in southern portions of Randolph County on occasion. A colorful, small, secretive snake, it spends much of its time under loose bark feeding mostly on lizards, skinks and smaller snakes. Photo: Eric Abernethy
ON THE PROWL – A scarlet kingsnake winds through pine bark and pine needles recently.
Scarlet Kingsnakes show up in southern portions of Randolph County on
occasion. A colorful, small, secretive snake that spends much of its’ time
under loose bark feeding mostly on lizards, skinks and smaller snakes. Photo: Eric Abernethy

A scarlet kingsnake winds through pine bark and pine needles recently. Scarlet Kingsnakes show up in southern portions of Randolph County on occasion. A colorful, small, secretive snake, it spends much of its time under loose bark feeding mostly on lizards, skinks and smaller snakes. Continue reading ON THE PROWL

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DON’T TREAD ON ME

DON’T TREAD ON ME An Eastern Hognose snake gets in a defensive posture in the sandhills of Hoffman, NC. Eastern Hognose snakes will act aggressively when confronted, puffing up to make themselves look bigger, but rarely strike or bite. When this posture does not work, the hognose will roll over and play dead. Eastern Hognose snakes are residents in Randolph County. Photo: Eric Abernethy
Photo: Eric Abernethy

An Eastern Hognose snake gets in a defensive posture in the sandhills of Hoffman, NC. Eastern Hognose snakes will act aggressively when confronted, puffing up to make themselves look bigger, but rarely strike or bite. When this posture does not work, the hognose will roll over and play dead.

Eastern Hognose snakes are residents in Randolph County.

Continue reading DON’T TREAD ON ME

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