Category Archives: Mr. Movie

A discussion of movies from classical to modern by Rusty Hammond.

Don’t ruin beautiful black-and-white films

Rusty Hammond
Rusty Hammond

Several years ago, a new dirty word snuck into the language. It may have even made it into some of the lesser dictionaries. It is COLORIZATION. It means taking movies shot in black and white and coloring them. Yecch!

Well, as far as I can tell, that process is as dead as film darkrooms.
For some reason, many people seem to have something against black and white movies. I think this is a mistake. Good directors know how to use the shadows and nuances of black and white to great advantage. Some of the greatest movies ever made are in black and white.

Continue reading Don’t ruin beautiful black-and-white films

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A look back at the career of the late Omar Sharif

Rusty Hammond
Rusty Hammond

Omar Sharif left us recently at 83. At his peak, he was one of the best-looking men on the planet. Barbra Streisand’s lines in Funny Girl say it best: “To tell the truth, it hurt my pride. The groom was prettier than the bride.”

He became a world-class bridge player and developed a second lucrative career as a syndicated bridge columnist. His film career is an almost perfect bell curve: Real bad movies to start, really good movies in the middle, real bad movies at the end.

Continue reading A look back at the career of the late Omar Sharif

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Does 3D improve your movie experience?

Rusty Hammond
Rusty Hammond

3D or not 3D — that is the question.

Let’s start with a confession.

I am probably older than you. The only thing I can do on my cell phone is make calls. In my last business, we had a coal-fired copier (OK, just kidding on that one). Anyway, I sort of don’t like change…
When I was a kid, they tried 3D with dogs like “House Of Wax.” It was dreadful, with equally bad special effects.

So what does this ancient curmudgeon think of the latest incarnation of 3D?

Continue reading Does 3D improve your movie experience?

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Have these five films slipped your notice?

Rusty Hammond
Rusty Hammond

Here are 5 movies from last year that are worth a look and which may have slipped under your radar.

‘The Good Lie’
“The Good Lie” was Reese Witherspoon’s other movie from 2014 (the more famous one being “Wild”). It is the true story of a group of Sudanese refugees helped to resettle in America after a harrowing time in their homeland. Their misadventures in learning our ways are both touching and hilarious. And, I guarantee a wet eye or two when this interesting film spools out.

Continue reading Have these five films slipped your notice?

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For film buffs, 2014 was the Year of the Documentary

Rusty Hammond
Rusty Hammond

The year 2014 was a spectacularly good one for documentaries. Two of my top three were docs, and there were many other very good ones.

“Finding Vivian Maier” is the fascinating and almost unbelievable
story of a quiet, low key Chicago woman who took the most astonishing photographs. She was a nanny all of her adult life. She never married and was unassuming and very private. Almost nobody knew what she was up to with that old camera.

Continue reading For film buffs, 2014 was the Year of the Documentary

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Did we realize these were dementia movies?

Rusty Hammond
Rusty Hammond

I recently saw Julianne Moore’s incredible performance in “Still Alice” (2014). She plays a university professor in the throes of early-stage Alzheimer’s disease.

She deservedly won the Best Actress Oscar, conveying the terror and helplessness that must affect those stricken with this terrible disease. It occurred to me later that I had seen several really excellent films centered on a character with some form of dementia.
The earliest example I can think of is “On Golden Pond” (1981). Before that one, such people were generally relegated to comic relief. Henry Fonda plays the patriarch of a small family.

Continue reading Did we realize these were dementia movies?

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